Environmental Awareness Club @ UTPA


An organization working towards a more Earth friendly campus, being involved with environmental and social issues in the RGV, and overall lovers of this beautiful planet! We meet every Thursday at the science building in room 1.288. Join us and be the difference you want to see in the world!

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rgvalternative:

The city commission of McAllen was unwilling to consider re-routing the road going in between the McAllen Botanical Garden and West Side Park. This unfortunately forces us to have to choose between an otherwise sound road project or the beginnings of destroying the last native green space in Mcallen, along with polluting the largest city park space used by families everyday. Nonetheless, the right choice should be obvious: Save Our Parks, Save Our Native Species, Vote AGAINST Prop 1 !

rgvalternative:

The city commission of McAllen was unwilling to consider re-routing the road going in between the McAllen Botanical Garden and West Side Park. This unfortunately forces us to have to choose between an otherwise sound road project or the beginnings of destroying the last native green space in Mcallen, along with polluting the largest city park space used by families everyday. Nonetheless, the right choice should be obvious: Save Our Parks, Save Our Native Species, Vote AGAINST Prop 1 !

woodendreams:

(by Rick Lundh)

woodendreams:

(by Rick Lundh)

sinobug:

Pale Green Awlet (Burara gomata) and caterpillar

subfamily Coeliadinae, family Hesperiidae

Coeliadinae is a subfamily of the skipper butterfly family (Hesperiidae) and include the awls, awlets, and policemen.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE

Source: Flickr / itchydogimages

mothernaturenetwork:

35 classic and creative recipes using pumpkin
Whether you are looking for a classic pumpkin pie recipe, a pumpkin latte recipe, or a savory take on pumpkin, this list is for you.

mothernaturenetwork:

35 classic and creative recipes using pumpkin

Whether you are looking for a classic pumpkin pie recipe, a pumpkin latte recipe, or a savory take on pumpkin, this list is for you.

Source: mothernaturenetwork

As is becoming clearer with each passing scientific report, the only long-term, viable solution to living in harmony with the earth is to overthrow capitalism and replace it with a different socioeconomic system of production and distribution, one that puts people and the planet before profit.

Source: socialistworker

skeptv:

Whales Get Sunburned, Too

Turns out whales like to spend time under the sun a little color too. But just like some people, some whales are getting way too much sun, and it’s causing them serious problems. Anthony discusses what’s going on and what, if anything, can be done.

via DNews Channel.

rhamphotheca:

Shy Cat Struts Before Dawn
Photo by Brian O’Shea
The margay, Leopardus wiedii, is rarely observed at close quarters. Bird-watching scientists in Suriname spotted this shy cat near dawn—at a distance of just 13 feet (4 meters). The margay is adapted to live in the trees, unlike most cats, and prowls aloft to hunt birds, rodents, and even monkeys.
(read more: National Geo)

rhamphotheca:

Shy Cat Struts Before Dawn

Photo by Brian O’Shea

The margay, Leopardus wiedii, is rarely observed at close quarters. Bird-watching scientists in Suriname spotted this shy cat near dawn—at a distance of just 13 feet (4 meters). The margay is adapted to live in the trees, unlike most cats, and prowls aloft to hunt birds, rodents, and even monkeys.

(read more: National Geo)

woodendreams:

(by Marc Adamus)

woodendreams:

(by Marc Adamus)

nybg:

rhamphotheca:

The Trees That Miss The Mammoths

Trees that once depended on animals like the wooly mammoth for survival have managed to adapt and survive in the modern world.

by Whit Bronaugh

Warning: Reading this article may cause a whiplash-inducing paradigm shift. You will no longer view wild areas the same way. Your concepts of “pristine wilderness” and “the balance of nature” will be forever compromised. You may even start to see ghosts.

Consider the fruit of the Osage-orange, named after the Osage Indians associated with its range. In the fall, Osage-orange trees hang heavy with bright green, bumpy spheres the size of softballs, full of seeds and an unpalatable milky latex. They soon fall to the ground, where they rot, unused, unless a child decides to test their ballistic properties.

Trees that make such fleshy fruits do so to entice animals to eat them, along with the seeds they contain. The seeds pass through the animal and are deposited, with natural fertilizer, away from the shade and roots of the parent tree where they are more likely to germinate. But no native animal eats Osage-orange fruits. So, what are they for? The same question could be asked of the large seed pods of the honeylocust and the Kentucky coffeetree.

To answer these questions and solve the “riddle of the rotting fruit,” we first need to go to Costa Rica. That is where tropical ecologist Dan Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania noticed that the fruits of a mid-sized tree in the pea family called Cassia grandis were generally scorned by the native animals, but gobbled up by introduced horses and cattle. Janzen, who received the Crafoord Prize (ecology’s version of the Nobel) for his work on the co-evolution of plants and animals, had the idea that the seeds of Cassia grandis, and about 40 other large-fruited Costa Rican trees, were adapted to be dispersed by large mammals that are now extinct. He teamed up with Paul Martin, a paleoecologist at the University of Arizona, to develop the concept of ecological anachronisms…

(read more: American Forests)

images: mammoth/mastodon reconstruction by Dantheman9758 | Wikipedia; fossil photo by Wolfmansf | Wiki; plant photos by Mark Wells and Dxlinh

You can find Osage oranges in the Garden and throughout New York City (I remember a proliferation of them in Prospect Park). The next time you see one, remember this story. Some also posit that pumpkins and other large fruit of the Cucurbita evolved as enticements to North America’s megafauna. ~AR

Source: rhamphotheca

markscherz:

hymn-of-the-demon-bug:

Endangered Species Spotlight: 

Arboreal Alligator Lizard (Abronia graminea), Mexico

http://www.arkive.org/abronia/abronia-graminea/

Source: snowbughymn

woodendreams:

(by Lijah Hanley)

woodendreams:

(by Lijah Hanley)

woodendreams:

(by Bill Ratcliffe)

woodendreams:

(by Bill Ratcliffe)

woodendreams:

(by Steve Perry)

woodendreams:

(by Steve Perry)

emilysquare:

Giant Puffball - Calvatia gigantea 
Spent a drizzly weekend in Maine and found the biggest puffball in the woods behind Owen’s house! 

emilysquare:

Giant Puffball - Calvatia gigantea 

Spent a drizzly weekend in Maine and found the biggest puffball in the woods behind Owen’s house! 

Would you pay $19 to kill a wolf? In Montana, 6,000 people just did. Montana only has 625 wolves left after last year’s killing season.

Not satisfied with the massacre, the state has lined up 10 times as many rifles as there are wolves to finish the job.